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MMA UNDERGROUND INC
 
 
KETTLEBELL STRENGTH TRAINING

 

The Kettlebell was the favorite tool of the strongmen of old times. It claims are explicit: a higher level of fitness then that produced by any known aerobic exercise. Kettlebell creates a new kind of fitness. Kettlebell brings strength plus endurance to all the muscles. No muscle group is neglected; muscles already well trained by other exercise and sports are even further upgraded by Kettlebells. Most exciting of all, the simultaneous movement of many muscles is a superlative way to train the heart and lungs. Hard kettlebells actually feel surprisingly easy. The Kettlebeller can become as strong as most lifters, as swift as most runners, and outwork both on a smaller investment of time with far fewer injuries.

 

TOP REASONS WHY KETTLEBELLS ARE THE MOST EFFECTIVE EXERCISE TOOL KNOWN: 

1. Burns Fat in Less Time

By use of the Peripheral Heart training (PHA), the entire body is trained. The idea is to provide uninterrupted blood flow throughout the body while taking no rest between sets, similar to circuit training. You will be doing 4 times the work, in a shorter time frame.

 

 

2. Displaced Center of Gravity
The kettelbell's center of gravity is 6-8 inches below the center of your hand. Barbells and dumbbells center the weight with your hand. The offset of the KB makes it “alive” in your hand and increases the difficulty and benefit of many of the drills. KBs can do anything a dumbbell can do, even better in fact, but not vice-versa.

 

 

3. Variety and Versatility
Your workout's variety is only limited by your imagination and safety. One KB, two KBs and combination drills provide unlimited protection from boredom. KBs can be used anywhere. It is basically a gym in one hand and provides you with a total body workout.

 

 

4. Balance of Tension and Relaxation
Tension is strength, relaxation is speed. An athlete must balance both to maximize skill. KB training utilizes a balance of tension and relaxation.

 

 

5. Trains Hip Extension and Deceleration
Ballistic KB drills provide an intense load to the hips and buttocks. Very similar to the vertical leap, this “grooved” hip extension transfers to many athletic skills such as jumping, running, and throwing. Similarly, deceleration occurs when “throwing” and “catching” the KB behind you. Your muscles contract together to produce force reduction and deceleration of the weight.

 

 

TACTICAL KETTLEBEL CLASS:

The class will be performed in three phases.

Phase 1: You will start with a full body warm up.

Phase 2: You will perform 13 different exercises in one, two, or three minutes rounds (depending on your conditioning) with one-minute or thirty seconds rest between each round.

Phase 3: You will be finishing up with stretching.

This type of training program will develop your cardio, strength and endurance, and will build a GLADIATOR out of you to last any competition, tournament or mixed martial arts match.

 

On the following pictures Beth Sensei will show you thirteen examples of the exercises that you will be performing in a class. These thirteen exercises will be changing weekly to guarantee a lively workout for mind and body.

 

  

                                                             1. High Swing                 2. Side Press.

 

  

                                                            3. Snatch.                        4. Jackknifes

 

  

                                                            5.  Double KB Clean.        6. Alternating jackknifes.

 

  

                                                             7. Alternating double KB Snatch.           8. Half get-ups.

 

  

                                                   9. Double KB suitcase dead lift.              10. Gladiator press.

 

  

                                                 11. Figure eight.                                       12. Get-up sit-up.

 

                                                                                     13. Double KB push-up.

 
Kettlebells:
The Martial Artist's Strength Tool of Choice
by Steve Cotter, Sr. RKC, CSCS

 

Confusion often surrounds the topic of strength training for the martial arts. There are generally two schools of thought on the subject. One school states that weight training is detrimental to martial skill acquisition because the excessive tension held in the muscles will reduce the fluidity of movement, thus robbing one's technique of speed and power. The other school says that strength training done correctly and as a compliment to the martial skill training will increase the contractile strength of the body without sacrificing flexibility, the end result being improved speed and power.

Where do I weigh in on this long-standing debate? Some weight training practices will indeed create sluggishness and a loss of tensile strength but only if the martial artist uses a body-building or train-to-failure approach. Any weight training will also diminish martial skill if it becomes the primary focus rather than a supplement to the martial arts skill training. Strength training, when the appropriate method is selected, will compliment and contribute to enhanced martial art skill, in the form of greater speed, power, flexibility and endurance.

So what is the right method of strength training for the martial artist? Why should a martial artist practice strength training, and how does one begin? While there are many training tools available, kettlebells are the tools that offer the most to the martial artist's strength training curriculum.

Of all the physical variables that the well-rounded martial artist must address when designing the right strength training program, there are 4 in particular that kettlebells address better than other training modes: strength/endurance, mental toughness/body hardening, martial specificity, and efficiency (economy of motion).

In a martial arts or fighting context, strength/endurance, or "enduring strength", is the ability to fight with intensity for extended engagements. This is even more crucial than maximal strength, or the ability to deliver one very powerful blow. Maximal or limit strength is very important as well, as in knockout power, or a quick submission, but the well rounded fighter must be prepared to deliver multiple strikes in combinations. This requires tremendous strength/endurance. Kettlebell high repetition snatches, for example, develops a strong work capacity and anaerobic threshold. This means that you learn to continue to apply power even while aerobically taxed. For the martial artist this is a very important skill. Often times it is not how strong you are when you are fresh but how strong you remain once you become winded and have expended a lot of energy that determines the outcome. Because kettlebell lifts require full-body integration, it is a much better tool for the martial artist than doing high repetition isolation movements with a barbell or dumbbell.

Mental toughness and body hardening are listed together because they cannot be separated in the application of martial arts. One who is "mentally tough" will fold under an effective thai kick to the lower leg, if his body is not sufficiently hardened for the impact. Likewise, the fighter with a ruggedly conditioned body will eventually waiver if he is kept in an uncompromising position, such as a lock, unless his focus is perfectly sharpened and mentally tough. Kettlebell training helps to develop the necessary psycho-physical balance that is crucial to effective martial arts. In exercises like the kettlebell clean and snatch, wherein the kettlebell flips around the hand, and rests on the forearm, there is body hardening occurring due to the impact of the bell on the arm. In the early stages, the bell tends to come crashing down on the forearm, even causing pain. The perseverance to proceed is an early test of one's mental resolve. As the techniques become more refined, there is less impact on the forearm, as one learns to move the hand fluidly inside of the kettlebell handle. Even still, the bell rests on the forearm, exerting pressure and over time increasing the density and hardness of the area. Such training as the high-repetition snatch and jerk as seen in traditional Girevoy Sport of Russia is a real test of both on's mental resolve to persevere and physical ability to accept pain. These attributes need to be embraced by the martial artist as well.

In sports science, the term "specificity" refers to the adaptations to the physiological systems that occur as a result of the training program design. For the martial artist, the strength that is developed through supplementary weight training must be able to transfer into improved striking, kicking, grappling, trapping, and throwing skills. If your fighting techniques increase in speed, power, and focus as a result of your strength training program, then your program has a high degree of specificity to your martial art skill. If you become more sluggish and start getting hit by people that couldn't hit you before then the strength training regimen is ill-designed and non-specific.

Like in martial art technique, in kettlebell lifting the grip, the hips (and core), and the stance are involved in every motion. The highly ballistic nature of such exercises as swings, cleans, snatches and jerks very closely mimic the type of explosive full-body integration involved in executing effective strikes, kicks, and throws.

The concept of training specificity ties in very closely with the concept of training efficiency; you won't have one without the other. With a strength training program that is specific to enhancing martial skills, we also develop efficiency. All martial art styles pursue an economy of motion. The prevailing quality in the movement of gifted martial artists is efficiency. This is irrespective of the style and is independent of the speed of execution. Efficient movement will remain efficient whether practiced at full speed or in slow motion. Efficiency relates to using only the energy necessary to achieve the result, nothing more. It also relates to spending only the time necessary to achieve the objective, no more. In a martial analogy, this means not using 1000 pounds of force, when 4 ounces will do. If you can unbalance the opponent with only slight movement, it is more efficient than using every last bit of energy to send him off balance. When cultivating martial skill, most of one's time should be spent on mastering the particular techniques of one's style, not on cross-training. The strength training protocol selected should be one that allows for specific strength gains without demanding too much time away from the martial skill practice. This means relatively short, intense workouts that allow the body to remain fresh for skill practice. The specific time guidelines are relative to the experience and physical attributes of the trainee, but as a rule of thumb, the strength training curriculum should not exceed 30% of the martial artist's total training. In other words, to be efficient with his use of time, the martial artist should spend at least 70% of the total practice time on the martial art skill training and not on lifting weights.

To develop an efficient strength training regime, kettlebells are the ideal choice because the types of movements are similar in nature to many of the basic martial art techniques. This contributes to the economy of motion — you are not being asked to learn radically different motor patterns. Take the 2 Kettlebell "rack position", in which 2 kettlebells are resting on your arms and body. This position is attained by taking a kettlebell in each hand and cleaning them to the top position. The kettlebells stay in the top position for a period of time. This 2 kettlebell rack position is mechanically very similar to a basic guard position, as in boxing. In a fighting stance, there of course will not be kettlebells in your hands, and one or both hands may be extended slightly in front of the body, with one foot forward. The action of the body, however, is virtually identical: the lats are "full", in a very strong compressed position, the shoulders are relaxed and sunken, the chest is hollow and the back is rounded, the knees have a gentle bend (springy), and the tailbone is tucked slightly under. Try this: take a fighting stance of your liking and bring the hands up in a guard position. Notice how it feels in the back/lat, abdominals and ribcage. It should feel very full, alive, and powerful, like a tiger ready to pounce. Now do the 2 kettlebell clean and hold them in the rack position. The same sensation of fullness in the torso should be present. The similarities in mechanics required for the martial technique and the kettlebell technique make the 2 kettlebell clean/rack a highly efficient choice of exercise, due to its specificity. Because you do not have to alter the body mechanics for the two movements, there is no wasted time in your strength practice. There are numerous other examples of kettlebell drills that have a high degree of specificity, and are mechanically efficient for martial artists. Some of the most significant characteristics of a well-rounded martial artist are strength/endurance, mental toughness/body hardening, martial specificity, and efficiency. These 4 attributes need to be addressed when supplementing martial arts practice with weight training. Kettlebells are the tool of choice for accomplishing these objectives, and when properly integrated will increase the speed, power, endurance and movement skill of the martial artist

 

 

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